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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
president is his life experience as a union negotiator was put to work in foreign policy. and what do you do if you're a negotiator you ask for a hundred percent and several for 50. you say the union reserves the right to lie cheat and steal he called it an evil empire before the national association of evangelicals in orlando, you can't make this stuff up. and then in 1985, safely reelected he meets with gorbachev and led to standing in the red square with gorbachev and say there's no longer an evil empire that belonged to another time. a year later the year he left the office ten months after he left washington the berlin wall comes down. so i think michael's exactly right about yes, coming out of the presidency he seemed to be an era of greed and deficits but it's pretty safe to say right now he's remembered for pretty effective foreign policy. >> rose: i wantto focus on foreign policy. so what is the challenge for the president in foreign policy? >> my discussions with him for the first book i did obama's wars and looking exactly how he makes decisions, it's very clear he does not like
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next few months. that will
and their second terms end up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats 234 congress than any other time in the 20th scentry except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election ne next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures rel
or foreign policy, the challenge is to overcome those obstacles that the political culture place in front of them. host: a call from cincinnati, ohio. caller: in a country where originally white people were not even citizens of this country and now we have a black president, i think we've come a long way. i feel that president obama has not done enough for either side. i think in the beginning it was an issue for him. now he's just like, i am going to be the president. but there are still people who cannot get past that. how does that affect his second term? i have to say, particularly republicans -- how do we get people over the issue of his race? guest: the sad reality is, there are some people that -- i do not think we want to make the mistake of exaggerating their numbers -- there are some people for whom they will never get over the issue of race. there are other people who quite sincerely, for reasons having nothing to do with race, believe that the president's agenda, in their estimation, is too fill-in-the-blank. the larger issue is how we create a political process in which any p
security hawk. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, r, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. \[applause] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. \[laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism, unabashed, unapologetic, i have to say sitting there it occurred to me somewhere the sea must be risin
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
viewpoint whether it be on foreign policy and anti-communist some come economic conservatism, the limited government, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservatism more likely than it would be called traditional conservatism. the issues were a little different and less clear back then there's always been social conservatism. rusher had a very important ally named frank meijer. meijer remains a respected and known at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a society here in washington which i'm going to be a group of leaders that keep this memo alive and they are good to be meeting on monday night and i am going to be speaking to them. he's been described as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he too was an ex-communist. but he was a conservative activist. a passionate conservative activist. rusher even told me that he had once been a militant communist viet cong had been a militant republican. quote, they are not all that far apart accepting what they believe. what he meant by that is the have a tremendous attraction and respect for frank
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks about education, it is axiomat
,000 front line jobs to women in the military. "outfront" tonight, rosa brooks, a columnist for foreign policy and has worked in the pentagon under the obama administration and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush and critter for us. right now, 40% of active duty are women. this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, the it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy, but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. fighting heroically in combat, women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of women who will speak and equally is likely to be quite low, but of those who do, i think
to the conservative viewpoint, whether it be on foreign policy and anti communism, economic conservative as some, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservatism more likely than can -- traditional conservatism. the issues were different and less clear back then but there has always been social conservatism. rusher had an important ally named frank meyer remains sufficiently respected and known among at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a frank meyer society in washington which i am going to be a group of conservative leaders who keep his memory alive. they are going to be meeting monday night and i will be speaking to them. meyer has been described by rusher as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he too was an ex-communist as burnham was. but meyer was a conservative activist. a passion that conservative activists. rusher even told me that meyer had once been a militant communist. rusher had been a militant republican, quote, they are not all that far apart except in what they believe. what rusher meant by that was he had it tremendous attr
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
is that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and that is a core issue that is affecting everything else? are you seeing it as a garnish on the salad? not essential. >> as a party, we need to have john and bill on that wing of the party. we also need those who acted and soggy world like we did -- and saw the world like we did in congress or we believed in a restrained foreign policy. that is part of the balance. did you go back and look at what william buckley said about iraq. he said it was not a conservative of venture. there's nothing conservative about believing that you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that do not have a democratic background. i think the bigger problem really has to duet the domestic side of things. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with its. the bigger problem from the bush era came that he was a big government republican. we had $155 billion surplus when he came in. when you that we had a $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a seven million-dollar
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of iran. i spent some time with one family this week. i think he knows that the worst case scenario is war, it always is the worst case scenario and he's hoping somehow we can stop them from weaponizing. >> but chris -- >> nuclear weapons. >> i think this was a forthrightly liberal speech. i think that -- >> you're an eight. >> he said we are a country that doesn't -- that believes that every citizen deserves a decent
we believed in a restrained foreign policy. so that's part of the balance. you know, you go back and you look at what william buckley said about iraq and he said it wasn't a conservative venture because there's nothing conservative about believing you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that don't have a democratic background. those were buckley's words, not mine. i think the bigger problem, though, really has to do on the domestic side of things because, you know, republicans i think as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from he was a big government republican. he came in, we had $155 billion surplus. when he left we had $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a $7 trillion medicare drug benefit plan that polls showed was a 50/50 proposition at best. george w. bush didn't veto a single appropriations bill. and we saw not only -- because when you say this and start going down the list, some republicans get defensive.
republican friends to be fair. i used to put republicans because i would trust them or on foreign policy. i think anybody who is fair and would look at the president's record -- he has done a wonderful job of advancing our interests as well as protecting us. once again, thank you 4 c- span.org so much. i am enjoying the coverage. host: naomi tweets in -- the metro stations here are very crowded. as we mentioned, metro is planning a rush hour schedule, which means a train every five- six minutes at every station throughout the day because of the large crowds. about 800,000 is the current estimate, to attend the inauguration wendy is on american calling in from sydney, australia. good afternoon, good evening, good morning to you. caller: it is good evening here. host: are you watching online? caller: i am watching on tv, on cable. i spent a good portion of my adult life here, but i am constantly reading -- reading the news about the state. i still consider myself a think sometimes my perspective gives me a broader vision. i can see the discord, the downside of what has been happening, but i c
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
fighter jets to egypt. here is louie gohmert on "fox & friends." this administration's foreign policy. the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending jets and tanks to a man who a leader whose only two enemies he he said in the past are israel and the united states are resupplying our enemies with the means to fight us. the founder and president of the amaker islamic forum and philosophy. thanks for being on the show. >> thanks, clayton for having me. >> if you listen to the congressman. he makes it sound as if egypt is our sworn enemy right now. is that the case? and, if so, why are we sending them the numbers i see 16 f-16s and 200 abraham's tanks by the end of the year? >> >> it's pretty horrifying clayton that we are doing. this and goes beyond the weaponry this is about supporting ideology sworn against the united states, against the west, ag
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
on two less obvious facets of foreign policy, the earnvinement and his economy and talked about the u.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with so
of foreign policy for the coming year. conor, thank you so much. we'll see you soon. bill: there are thousands heading to the national mall in washington. it is called the largest human rights demonstration in the world. we are live to tell you what that's all about in just minutes. martha: and missing, now, in iran, they do not know where this american pastor who is being held in iran is. his family now can't find hill. they visit him every week and now he is gone. big questions. we will speak to his wife after this. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. that's a good thing, but
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)